Idaho School Psychologist Association
 

NASP Delegate Assembly Report


March 2019

Here we are in March already! The NASP 2019 Annual Convention has concluded, and we have only a few months left this academic year.

Take a look below for the latest NASP news, resources, and information:

The NASP 2019 Annual Convention in Atlanta drew over 5,200 attendees from around the world who participated in over 1,200 sessions. It’s encouraging that nearly 40% of attendees were school psychology graduate students—this is a great sign for the future of school psychology. You can still participate in the Atlanta convention and earn CPD from selected sessions by ordering session recording packages here: https://nasp.inreachce.com/SearchResults?searchType=1&category=6c2a6b6c-f108-4eba-bf55-66f49079dfc1

Save the Date: NASP 2020 Annual Convention, February 18–21, 2020, in Baltimore, MD

Congratulations to our colleagues who received prestigious NASP Awards at the NASP 2019 Annual Convention! I admire them in new ways after hearing them share touching stories on stage. Meet the award winners here: http://www.nasponline.org/membership-and-community/awards-scholarships-and-grants, and the NASP-ERT Minority Scholarship winners here: http://www.nasponline.org/membership-and-community/awards-scholarships-and-grants/minority-scholarship-program.

Michael Bonner, keynote speaker in Atlanta, was an inspiration. His keynote address is available to view at http://www.nasponline.org/x38302.xml. His personal story of trial and triumph highlights how students can succeed with the right motivation and positive relationships. Looking through the lens of diversity and inclusion, he presents evidence-based data on how positive attention to students can not only debunk stereotypes, but also encourage extraordinary results.

New Position Statement: Students Who Are Displaced Persons, Refugees, or Asylum-Seekers. Children who have been displaced may face unique mental health challenges, in many cases resulting from traumatic experiences related to displacement. School psychologists can ease the transition for newcomer students and their families by facilitating efficient enrollment processes, developing welcoming and affirming school climates, assisting students and families with navigating the school environment, developing cultural responsiveness and empathy among school staff and students, providing academic and mental health supports (including trauma-sensitive care), and collaborating with community service providers to meet needs and maximize resiliency.

https://www.nasponline.org/research-and-policy/professional-positions/position-statements

School Safety: This spring marks the first anniversary of the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida and Santa Fe High School in Texas, as well as the 12-year anniversary of the shootings at Virginia Tech and the 20-year anniversary of the shootings at Columbine High School in Colorado. For members of these communities, such anniversaries can have significant emotional and psychological impact, known as the anniversary effect. They also often result in considerable media attention, which has the potential to extend the impact to other individuals and communities.

http://www.nasponline.org/parklandanniversary

  • See brief facts and tips for school violence prevention at http://www.nasponline.org/resources-and-publications/resources/school-safety-and-crisis/school-violence-prevention
  • Tips for parents and teachers on talking to children about violence, available in 11 languages: http://www.nasponline.org/resources-and-publications/resources/school-safety-and-crisis/talking-to-children-about-violence-tips-for-parents-and-teachers

Read the latest from the NASP Public Policy Blog: http://www.nasponline.org/research-and-policy/policy-matters-blog: “The Great Divide - Reaching Across the Aisle.” Today we are familiar with significant political divide. However, as school-based mental health providers, we are uniquely qualified to reach across the aisle and do what we can to find a way to create a relationship with someone who may disagree with us. By listening to their core messages, you might find something that this country so desperately needs … common ground. This level of advocacy—powered by you—might be just the thing that helps advance our efforts and create systematic change for the students that we serve.

NASP has released two new publications: 'Helping Handouts: Supporting Students at School and Home' (electronic version only) and 'School Psychology in a Global Society: Roles and Functions.'

  • You may remember previous editions of the Helping Handouts publication in the big binder. This edition is online and provides 87 handouts to print, e-mail, or download for parents and educators. Quickly search by keyword or within sections to find what you need for IEP meetings or when writing reports. After you purchase, you can access it from any device through the Internet. Visit www.nasponline.org/HHportal to learn more.
  • School Psychology in a Global Society is perfect for graduate preparation programs. The book addresses the evolution of the profession and current and future demands placed on school psychologists, particularly in terms of social justice. Visit www.nasponline.org/globalsociety to learn more.

Mark your calendar for the NASP 2019 Summer Conferences—July 8–10 in Phoenix, AZ, and July 22–24 in Hartford, CT. Watch for information to be e-mailed within the next few weeks.

Like NASP on Facebook, follow on Twitter, Instagram, and with #naspadvocates

Sincerely,

Cirstin J. Zimmermann
NASP State Delegate - ID
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